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ISBN: 1-886778-15-9
Page count: 462
Book Size: 5-1/2" x 8-1/2"
Published: February 2003

Edited by James A. Mann
Cover art by Bob Eggleton
Jacket design by Kevin M. Riley

PO Box 809
Framingham, MA 01701
fax: 617-776-3243

When John W. Campbell decided to write in a new style, a style different from the bombastic space opera which filled the SF magazines, he adopted a pen name, Don A, Stuart, to distinguish his work. From the first Don A. Stuart story, Twilight, Stuart was hailed as a major new talent in the field. With one exception, they were all published in Astounding Stories. Also included are two articles by Campbell (writing as Stuart), neither of which have ever appeared before in book form.

NESFA Press is publishing all of John W. Campbell's Don A Stuart stories in a single volume.

Story Date Length Comments
The Man Who Lost the Sea 2002 introduction by Barry N. Malzberg
Twilight Nov 1934 short story
Atomic Power Dec 1934 short story
The Machine Feb 1935 short story Machine series #1
The Invaders Jun 1935 novelette Machine series #2
Rebellion Jul 1935 short story Machine series #3
Blindness Mar 1935 short story
The Escape May 1935 novelette
Night Oct 1935 novelette
Elimination May 1936 short story
Frictional Losses Jul 1936 novelette
Forgetfulness Jun 1937 novelette
Out of Night Oct 1937 novelette Aesir series #1
Cloak of Aesir Mar 1939 novelette Aesir series #2
Dead Knowledge Jan 1938 novelette
Who Goes There? Aug 1938 novelette
The Elder Gods Oct 1939 novella Appeared in Unknown
Strange Worlds Apr 1939 article Appeared in Unknown
Wouldst Write, Wee One? Feb 1940 article Appeared in Scienti-Snaps

John W. Campbell, Jr.

John Wood Campbell, Jr. was born in 1910 and graduated from Duke University in 1932. "When the Atoms Failed," his first published story, appeared in Amazing Stories in January 1930. During the 1930s, he became the chief rival of Doc Smith in writing super-science stories. His career took a different track with the publication of "Twilight," an introspective, atmospheric story, in 1934.

In 1937, he became the editor of Astounding Science Fiction (later Analog), a post he held until his death in 1971. In this position, he changed the face of science fiction, fostering writers such as Robert A. Heinlein, Isaac Asimov, A. E. van Vogt, and L. Sprague de Camp. After he became an editor, Campbell effectively stopped writing, writing only a handful of stories between 1937 and 1971.

Bob Eggleton

Bob Eggleton is a science fiction, fantasy and landscape artist. Winner of 7 Hugo Awards and 11 Chesley Awards, his art can be seen on the covers of magazines and books. He is a Fellow of The New England Science Fiction Association (NESFA), and has created artwork for the covers of several other NESFA Press books.